90 Miles From Tyranny : Why Some Scientists Say Global Warming Is Out and Global Cooling Is In

Tuesday, October 23, 2018

Why Some Scientists Say Global Warming Is Out and Global Cooling Is In

In a world riddled with climate-change doomsday predictions, a small but growing number of scientists are saying the highly touted climate models predicting steadily increasing global temperature due to humans’ carbon-dioxide emissions are wrong and that Earth could soon face something even more dire: global cooling.

One such climate scientist is Valentina Zharkova, an astrophysicist at Northumbria University in the United Kingdom. Zharkova and her team of researchers say that based on mathematical models of the Sun’s magnetic activity, it’s likely Earth will experience decreasing magnetic waves over a 33-year period beginning in 2021.

Zharkova is not alone. In 2017, researchers at the Physical Meteorological Observatory Davos, the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, ETH Zurich, and the University of Bern published a model projecting a cooling period “in 50 to 100 years’ time.” Numerous other studies have made similar projections. Indeed, the website NoTricksZone lists hundreds of peer-reviewed papers that argue solar activity and solar cycles have a substantial influence on global climate change on decadal, century-long, and millennial time scales. Some of these papers even argue that solar activity is often the dominant factor driving climate change.

The researchers say reduced solar magnetic activity has previously been linked to historically cool periods in Earth’s history, such as the Maunder Minimum, a period of lower magnetic activity associated with a “mini ice age” that occurred from 1645 to 1715. During the Maunder Minimum, temperatures plummeted to such an extreme degree that Londoners held “frost fairs” on the frozen Thames River.

Writing for the New York Times, historian Geoffrey Parker notes, “The unusual cold that lasted from the 1620s until the 1690s included ice on both the Bosporus and the Baltic so thick that people could walk from one side to the other.”

Although Zharkova says her model’s accuracy is 97 percent, she’s not sure precisely how impactful lower solar magnetic activity will be, especially because it is believed there is a lot more carbon dioxide in the atmosphere today than in the seventeenth century, and many climate scientists believe higher CO2 levels cause additional warming.

Many of those convinced that humans are responsible for the higher global temperatures recorded over the past century have already started to dismiss Zharkova and others who say global temperature could soon level off because...

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