90 Miles From Tyranny : In The Latest Bill, Congress Tried To Nullify The President's Use Of The Insurrection Act...

Wednesday, December 23, 2020

In The Latest Bill, Congress Tried To Nullify The President's Use Of The Insurrection Act...


 

























The Insurrection Act gives U.S. presidents the authority to deploy active duty military to maintain or restore peace in times of crisis. The Insurrection Act was invoked numerous times in the 20th century, most famously when Dwight D. Eisenhower sent the 101st Airborne Division to enforce the desegregation of public schools in Little Rock, Arkansas.

But the origins of the Insurrection Act date back more than 200 years to a bizarre chapter in American history—when Aaron Burr plotted to raise an army and establish his own dynasty in either the Louisiana Territory or Mexico.

Burr, a decorated Revolutionary War officer and senator from New York, served as vice president during Thomas Jefferson’s first term. Burr had grand political aspirations, but they were dashed after he killed his rival Alexander Hamilton in a duel in 1804.

After Duel With Hamilton, Burr Sets Sights on Louisiana

Burr was never arrested or tried for Hamilton’s murder, but it effectively ended Burr’s political career. With no prospects in Washington, D.C. or New York, Burr set his sights on the West, namely the newly acquired Louisiana Territory and Mexican-owned lands in the Southwest.

The details of Burr’s plot were never clear, but it involved mustering an army to invade Mexico under the pretense of a war with Spain, and then keeping the conquered land for himself. Burr thought he had an ally in General James Wilkenson, commander of the U.S. Army and first governor of the Louisiana Territory, but...



Read More HERE

4 comments:

  1. It is way past time that we 'nullify' Congress in its entirety and start over.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I'm sick of those bastards.
    Give 'em hell DJT!

    ReplyDelete
  3. I searched the bill for the word "Insurrection" using adobe and came up empty

    ReplyDelete

Test Word Verification